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[Merged] Human Rights In Nigeria

Webdude

Newbie
NLC
anhedonia - There's an old saying that says worry about the log in your own eye before you about the splinter in another person's eye.

Maybe you should perfect everything in your own country before dealing with others?

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On the other side of the line
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If this woman has broken one of their laws, then she should indeed be punished as with any law. However, I think stoning her is going a bit overboard. The max punishment should maybe be a couple of years in jail if it is seen as a larger crime there....but certainly not death.

Instead of trying to convince them to drop charges, offer alternative punishment (fine, a little jail time, etc) and explain why it is better for the woman to live (child needs a mother, daddy cant work and pay taxes as much if he has to care for a baby, etc.). If go all gung-ho, you will get ignored. Try to meet in the middle, and you might get somewhere. They are interested in punishing a lawbreaker, and they will do so regardless. Plant a seed in their minds that makes them wonder if killing this woman is really the right thing to do. After all, she didnt murder a person, she brought in new life. From a Government's point of view, that's a future tax payer..you just have to get them to see it that way ;)
 

Webdude

Newbie
NLC
Originally posted by conkermaniac


I would prefer lifetime imprisonment to the death penalty, as if you find out they were really innocent 5 years later, they can still be released and compensated for. :(
I'd rather be put to death. Freedom or Death.
 

Webdude

Newbie
NLC
Originally posted by conkermaniac


If you were innocent, you'd rather be put to death?
Yes. Hard question, but yes. If there were no DNA evidence to prove otherwise, then it's highly unlikely I would ever be set free. Death is not something I am afraid of. But then I also believe there is something better on the other side of it. But to live even 5 years in prison is too much. For me, even 1 year would be too much.

What I AM afraid of is possibly being in an accident that "could" have killed me, but instead leaves me physically or mentally retarded.
 

invisionz

New Member
You can always commit suicide.... :)

Or, ask Dr Kevorkian, i'm sure he would be interested in help you. :)

Originally posted by Webdude


Yes. Hard question, but yes. If there were no DNA evidence to prove otherwise, then it's highly unlikely I would ever be set free. Death is not something I am afraid of. But then I also believe there is something better on the other side of it. But to live even 5 years in prison is too much. For me, even 1 year would be too much.

What I AM afraid of is possibly being in an accident that "could" have killed me, but instead leaves me physically or mentally retarded.
 

Blank Verse

NLC
NLC
Originally posted by Webdude

If this woman has broken one of their laws, then she should indeed be punished as with any law. However, I think stoning her is going a bit overboard. The max punishment should maybe be a couple of years in jail if it is seen as a larger crime there....but certainly not death.

Instead of trying to convince them to drop charges, offer alternative punishment (fine, a little jail time, etc) and explain why it is better for the woman to live (child needs a mother, daddy cant work and pay taxes as much if he has to care for a baby, etc.). If go all gung-ho, you will get ignored. Try to meet in the middle, and you might get somewhere. They are interested in punishing a lawbreaker, and they will do so regardless. Plant a seed in their minds that makes them wonder if killing this woman is really the right thing to do. After all, she didnt murder a person, she brought in new life. From a Government's point of view, that's a future tax payer..you just have to get them to see it that way ;)

You have to remember Webdude, we're not dealing with any Texas government here. Things are done differently. Laws, Religion, culture, all stays strictly by the book. As far as those things go, there is no such thing as an alternative. The government, police, whoever may be involved here are not thinking in a monetary sense. It doesn't work the same way as it does in North America. In short, there government does not act like a government, so to speak, as in they deal with these issues a lot differently than we would. And I think we're all forgetting that. Maybe to them, stoning her to death is justifiable. Personally, I think it's sick, but then you go to certain places in Asia, and it's completely normal to be eating a cat. That's something I could never fathom.

Basically, the world isn't as small as we think.
 

carlito

New Member
Human Rights In Nigeria

It recently came to my attention just how bad human rights are being abused in Nigeria.

Amina Lawal, a 30 year-old Muslim woman, was sentenced on Friday 22 March 2002 to stoning to death for having a baby while divorced. The stoning to death involves throwing rocks and stones at her head and body until she dies.

I am extremely annoyed about this. It's shocking! :eek:
I read all this on the Amnesty International site, the link here: http://web.amnesty.org/web/content.nsf/pages/gbr_nigeria.

There it shows you what you can do to help by sending an email to one of the leaders there in North Nigeria. If everyone sends email maybe, just maybe, we can make a difference. Maybe they will take notice and stop. Just maybe...
 

anhedonia

I'm on a boat
NLC
Re: Human Rights In Nigeria

Originally posted by carlito
There it shows you what you can do to help by sending an email to one of the leaders there in North Nigeria. If everyone sends email maybe, just maybe, we can make a difference. Maybe they will take notice and stop. Just maybe...
Okay, I have four e-mail addresses of my own, I'll send one from each of them, and I'm going to copy down those postal addresses and write my own letter and send it off tomorrow. Also, I'm telling everyone I can to send that e-mail at the very least.

Thanks very much for posting that link.
 

Johnny

b&
b&
O well, to bad for that nigerian women, that is there law, and she know the punish for commiting that crime. Like united states we have the death penalty. Why should we and the goverment execute someone as revenage, I find that very barbaric but o well. The real reason for the dealth penalty is to save money. and the reason for that penalty in nigera is probably to prevent adultry.
 

Dusty

NLC
NLC
[In the] united states we have the death penalty [, the real reason of which] is to save money.
Not really. In the end, it actually costs a fair deal more to execute someone in the US than to just imprison them for life. One study, conducted in 1993, says each execution costs $2.16 million more than life imprisonment.
 

Johnny

b&
b&
what study that? i really want to see it, cause there is no way it could $2.16 million more. just for imprisioning any one in prision for whatever crime they commited. shows that a year it cost at least $40,000 for each inmate. now, a inmate could live till 90 before he dies. So unless they use poison that cost $100,000 to execute an inmates, I don't know it would cost more to execute.
 

Dusty

NLC
NLC
what study that? i really want to see it
"The Costs of Processing Murder Cases in North Carolina", Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy, Duke University, May 1993.
So unless they use poison that cost $100,000 to execute an inmates, I don't know it would cost more to execute.
It's not as simple as buying a vial of poison, charging a chair, or tying a noose. The execution itself, though it's true that it's an extremely costly matter, is not where the bulk of the money is spent. In a death sentence there are countless appeals (whether the defendant wants them or not), with defending attorneys earning four times what they would in a non-death case and prosecuting attorneys earning more than twice, with costly investigation and yet more costly re-investigation, etc., etc... it's a truly expensive and drawn-out ordeal. The point of the death penalty is not to save money.
 

Johnny

b&
b&
you get appeals either way, and not always people on death role get appeals to the supreme court you know. the supreme court only hear 1,000 cases a year the most.

And even president bush said that the "death penalty save lifes" what he really means is that it will safe money. by putting them in prsion for the rest of there lifes also save lives you know. thats why they have a prision to protect people from dangerous criminals.
 

Dusty

NLC
NLC
Sure thing Johnny. If that's what you want to think, far be it from me to dissolution you. I'll step out of this now off-topic thread rather than continue reasoning to apparently deaf ears. If anyone else cares to read the article I cited above, why not have a go. You might also want to pay a visit to http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/-- drearily designed, but informative nonetheless.
 

Johnny

b&
b&
1 capital case $57,000. 50 years in prision x $40,000 = 900,000

that is what I think
And not all capital cases ended up with execuation.
 

Todd

NLC
NLC
I've seen studies that say the same thing Dusty. There was also a TV interview with the people who are involved with the process and they talked about how stressful it is on everyone. I can't say I'm a fan of the death penalty but in some cases it's hard to deny that the person deserves it. Clearly though, this isn't one of those cases.

Go back to my jaywalking comment, if you know the punishment is death and do it anyway for whatever reason it still doesn't justify the punishment. You shouldn't get off the hook but there should be a reasonable sentence (compromise) like WebDude said.

The greater question is this: Why wouldn't their government step in and stop it? It sounds as though they oppose the action..
The Federal Government has made half-hearted attempts to oppose it, once declaring it unconstitutional, but had seemed unwilling or unable to directly challenge the 12 states over the issue.
 

Johnny

b&
b&
well, everyone have different opinion about dealth penalty, so i can't say what is ok or not,


"Go back to my jaywalking comment, if you know the punishment is death and do it anyway for whatever reason it still doesn't justify the punishment. You shouldn't get off the hook but there should be a reasonable sentence (compromise) like WebDude said."

how is that not justify the punishment? you know the laws and you broke it. its a matter of it being cruel and unusual. and compromising is the wishes of the district attorney.

what if a country don't like the death penatly and believe its barbaric, its unclivilzed, who are they to say what and how we punish our people. no one made them king. and no one made us king to say they can't execuate people for adultry. maybe adultry in nigera is a captial offense.. it would be fair if they also stone the man too!

there is a bias crime law now, if you beat up some guy for you get the most probably i think 1 year in prision. But I know that if you beat up someone and call them a racial slur or beat them up cause of there ethnic background, you can get up to 25 years in prison, they are better off killing that guy, cause you get minium of 15 years in prision for 1st degree murder. and you know that in many cases, 1st murder cases get plea bargains, and they end up going to prision for like 4-12years for 2nd degree murder, since the rules for plea is 1 step lower in charge.
 
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Webdude

Newbie
NLC
Actually, adultery is wrong. It always has been. Even the U.S. has laws against it, but arent enforced. Since they arent enforced, it has resulted in unwanted children, abortion controveries, widespread disease, increase taxes due to welfare, etc, etc. Tons of problems that you wouldnt otherwise have. Both the common citizen and the Government have to deal with them.

I was prepared say I still disagree with a death sentence for the crime of adultry, but after re-reading the paragraph I just wrote...... I am starting to wonder which is worse. Death for the crime? Or the eventual negative nation-wide outcome of allowing adultry to go unpunished such as I stated above?
 

Johnny

b&
b&
so you are agreeing with the punishment because of the outcome its going to have?

Now, we dont' know there culture much, but i know that in muslim, adultry from a female is a very serious crime, thats why you many muslim in bercas. So they probably just following there religion or something, to prevent adultry at all cause. And this crime doens't even have to do with accedent, like murder, there is always manslaughter. and 2nd degree. but in this case there is no such thing as acceident, what she is going to say "we got naked and he tripped on a rock, and now i am preganet"

U.S may not enforce adultry, but that will get you divorce, in court, and you will 50% of your asset. so that is like death penatly and worst you have to pay child support, even if the child is not yours (its the law).
 
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